Reviews

Udayan Vajpeyi
Poet Bharat Bhavan Museum
1995, Bhopal, India

About Bsakets & Air

Show german translation

Über Körbe und Luft

Sie kam zu uns und ich begann, wie ein Ortsirrer, sie einzuordnen - geografisch, in einem Land, auf einem Berg, in einem Flugzeug. Sie sprach über Luft. Sie findet, dass die Luft überall dieselbe ist und sie gehört der Luft. Sie breitet sich wie transparente Farbe in der Luft ihres Seins aus - direkt vor meinen Augen. Dann kam ihr Sohn in den Raum, in dem wir gerade sprachen. Ja, er kam mit einem Strauß aus seinen Liedern, seinen Farben, seinen Tänzen. Eigentlich konnte ich ihn den Raum betreten fühlen aus tausenden Kilometern Entfernung. Ich konnte die Malerin Gosha sehen, wie sie ein Portrait malte, ein Portrait ihrer selbst, Malerin Gosha malte das Portrait von Mutter Gosha, die sich in den Wassern der Liebe spiegelt, in den Augen ihres Sohnes, der den Raum betritt in dem wir sprechen und doch nicht hereinkommt.

Sie hat einen Teil von sich überall dort hinterlassen, wo sie war oder nicht war. Ihre Gemälde sind Körbe, in denen sie die Fragmente der Orte sammelt, die von ihrem Dasein eingefärbt werden. Nein, es sind keine solchen Körbe, in denen sie Erinnerungen aufbewahren würde. Nein, keine Erinnerungen sondern das Leben selbst.

Gosha sammelt die Farben ihrer Abschiede wie Wolle von den Büschen in den fernen Bergen Kaschmirs, in Erinnerung an die weisen Worte ihres Vaters: „Nimm nur diejenige,  die auf den Strauch gefallen ist...“

Udayan Vajpeyi, Poet

 

Linde Rohardt
Art Historian, Kunsthalle Hamburg, Germany
January 2005, Hamburg

Gosha

The quietness, the sublimity as well as a consciously chosen simplification are the characteristics that transmit and radiate Gosha’s works.
The motor of her artistic work is her sense and her sensuality, sometimes her wisdom. All of this emphasize the poetry of her paintings.

Show full Review

„I have my eyes, I have my hands and I have my sense – these three come together in total harmony.“

With these words Gosha describes her artistic engagement in oil and water colour paintings, in printed media, in woodcuts, in charcoal and ink drawings and in painted glass. Artistic emotion becomes criterion for her work.

Gosha’s talent has been encouraged by Japanese artists and teachers at Jyoshibi College of Fine Arts in Tokio. Here Gosha has experienced old and new technics of wood-cut and lithographie and has found her own style and individual expression.

All works, that Gosha produces, reflect her principles of artistic engagement: “If you are in a deep silence with yourself, the painting flows.” Gosha is experiencing artistic work as a flowing process just as life.

The quietness, the sublimity as well as a consciously chosen simplification are the characteristics that transmit and radiate Gosha’s works.

Around the year 1980 Gosha produces paintings that concentrate on the female face and the female figure. In these pictures Gosha accentuates the line and the proportion. With hard and soft contours she emphasizes the outlines, with flowing and curved lines and smooth strokes she works out the form. Gosha prefers black colour on off-white painting background, occasionally she uses colour intensively – just depending on her mood. In every picture Gosha lets her sensuality flow. Gosha selects and sets colours following her emotions. The warm coloration of red and orange tones, for example, is full of sensuality and above all the dark contours form the face or the figure intensively pure and in fluid linearity.

In most figural pictures Gosha transmits her sensual emotions. Her portraits never show a certain person but always a certain expression and are therefore a symbol for the conditions of life. Gosha’s figures stand for a meaningful expression such as love or pensiveness.

Around 1998 Gosha creates new motives and themes in her art, sometimes with a tendency to abstraction. There are, for example, oil-paintings which show fresh and faded leaves in circulation. They are symbolic for living and dying, for the natural cycle of life and death. Nature is a very important impulse for Gosha’s work, because in nature, as Gosha says, you can feel and touch life. Nature never lies and has always been a reliable teacher for her.

In the last five years Gosha experiences the painting of glass such as small and big wind-lights.

Here too, she uses colours as an expression of mood and atmosphere. Gosha mixes and creates many different colours. She applies them in tiny, flowing strokes to the glass. Gosha selects every colour with care while painting each glass with letters, symbols and little depictions or whatever flows out of her hand and her mind. No glass is alike the other. Each glass is an unique, beautiful and heart-warming treasure.

Line and colour are the criterions with which Gosha expresses her mind and her feelings. Her artistic mission is, to bring together in harmony what she sees and what she feels. Gosha’s art cannot be classified in stylistic terms. Her work focuses on an individually experienced moment of life. 
The motor of her artistic work is her sense and her sensuality, sometimes her wisdom. All of this emphasize the poetry of her paintings. Gosha puts her artistic work into the circle of life and nature and invites the recipient to do so too.

Gosha can be visited in her lovely atelier in Eppendorf. Here she lives with her son Toshi and her cat Kama. Gosha likes to meet people, loves to discuss art and life and warmly welcomes every visitor.

 

Bernd M. Kraske, Art Historian, Museum Director
Museum Rade am Schloß Reinbek, Germany
7. Juni 1998, Hamburg

Gosha´s Painting

The circle of life and the eternal play of life and death is what inspires the artist and gives her the impulse to create her work. As a dry leaf gradually withers, dies and falls to the ground, a new one rises and comes to life. This is portrayed so simply and subtly that nobody need argue. There is no manipulation and no ideology – only the unprejudiced view of everything that exists in nature.

One could think the means used are modest, yet this modesty is the result of intense concentration and contemplative silence. The lines are joined to make distinctly outlined forms of extreme reduction and simplicity.

Show full Review

Gosha’s art leads us to the intersection of two cultures: on one hand, her technique and theme is deeply rooted in her home, India. On the other hand, she has a strong foundation of western culture in her.

Gosha is the daughter of an Indian father and a Polish mother. She grew up in Kashmir and moved to Tokyo when she was 19 years of age, where she studied art. For the past 10 years, she has been living in Hamburg.

She has inherited her love and joy of art from her parents, who were both artists. Her unique origin allows her to blend both the traditions of her roots as well as her in depth experiences of both Japan and Europe.

Gosha has rapidly managed to gain acclaim in this country through her paintings, countless exhibitions and shows. She has done this without the usual stupidity and falseness of attention seeking which is inherent in the current world of art. Far removed from all trends, she is passionately and devotedly working towards the search for harmony, the origin of the cosmos and through this, of all life.

The circle of life and the eternal play of life and death is what inspires the artist and gives her the impulse to create her work. As a dry leaf gradually withers, dies and falls to the ground, a new one rises and comes to life. This is portrayed so simply and subtly that nobody need argue. There is no manipulation and no ideology – only the unprejudiced view of everything that exists in nature.

Furthermore, it gives us a symbolic view of the weight of the globe being carried by a simple leaf. Weight, dynamics and inertia and the speed of change are all suspended for a moment: the leaf carries and holds the entire cosmos, including us. It harmonises the opposites. This is portrayed with a broad brush in clear, dynamic strokes. One could think the means used are modest, yet this modesty is the result of intense concentration and contemplative silence. The lines are joined to make distinctly outlined forms of extreme reduction and simplicity.

This state of contemplation transfers itself onto the object through the medium of painting. Leaves, flowers, floral stems, garlands and human beings are reduced to the characteristics of their countenance. With large eyes, these female faces look at us with a hint of melancholy, as though they know of all the secrets in the word, all the sorrow and pain, stemming from a deep knowledge of the inconsistency of being.

They watch our doings with soft resignation, almost with an otherworldly air. It seems as though they are saying: it doesn’t matter what you are doing and thinking, reality is stronger than any imagination, the truth lies with reality and not in the pictures that you make of it. This, I feel, is a modest approach. It also gives us an unobstructed view of the passion driving this artist.

The minimalist technique concentrating on simple lines is supported by the choice of colour. Black and white or black on brick red are the predominant colours in Gosha‘ s work. Later works of plants and leaves are also mostly monochromatic. Colour is applied like a paste. Then spatula and scratching techniques provide structure.

As much as the monochromatic work gives us an ethereal feeling of calm and sovereign spirituality, so do the earlier, more colourful miniatures speak of an uncomplicated, open and experimental creativity.

Between an increasing release of concreteness and completely informal abstraction, we see lines and spirals, floral depictions dancing in, with and alongside each other, to create a joyful play of colours expressing sensuality and passion. The simple joy of painting wins over the otherwise stern observance of Gosha‘ s creative power.

Dear Gosha, we welcome you and your art into our museum. We thank you for coming, for your work and for your professional preparation of this exhibition and we wish you many visitors in warm and interesting conversation with each other, with you and in a silent dialogue with your paintings. Perhaps they will find things long ago forgotten: the image of humanity and the desire of colour and art. Art is deed, which happens for mankind.

 

Katrin Winkler Kulturmanagerin
Potsdam, Germany

Serendipity
Harmonisches Zusammenkommen
Vernissage am 8. März 2008

Goshas Kunst ist geboren aus der Intuition. Um Gestalt anzunehmen – in welcher Form auch immer, sei es als Malerei, Zeichnung, Druckgraphik, Glasmalerei oder Keramik – wird der Zustand innerer Ruhe und Kontemplation zu einer conditio sine qua non, zur unabdingbaren Voraussetzung. Nur dann steigen die inneren Bilder an die Oberfläche hoch und verlangen danach, Gestalt anzunehmen. Diese Vision von dem zu schaffenden Werk gibt Gosha den entscheidenden Impuls für den künstlerischen Akt.

Show full Review (German)

Herzlich willkommen hier in den Räumen von primaDonna, dem Kultur- und Bildungsbereich des Vereins Frauenzentrum Potsdam. Heute ist der INTERNATIONALE FRAUENTAG – und international geht es heute auch bei uns zu: Kunst, Büffet und Film. Ich freue mich, dass Sie, an diesem Samstag Morgen, hier her gekommen sind: Serendipity – Harmonisches Zusammenkommen- so heißt die Ausstellung die Gosha Nagashima-Soden für uns zusammen gestellt hat. Herzlich willkommen Gosha! Serendipity – ein Wort, welches nicht unbedingt zum englischen Grundwortschatz gehört. Lassen Sie uns dieses Wort doch einfach mal gemeinsam laut aussprechen: Serendipity...

Serendipity
A harmonious coming together                  Harmonisches Zusammenkommen
A beautiful coming together by chance     Zufällig- ein schönes Zusammenkommen
A harmonious encounter                             Eine harmonische Begegnung

Wörtlich übersetzt bedeutet SERENDIPITY
1.    Spürsinn
2.    glücklicher Zufall
3.    mehr Glück als Verstand
4.    zufällige Entdeckung

International- Gosha Nagashima-Soden: indisch und polnische Wurzeln, wuchs in Kaschmir und Polen auf, Studium und Leben in Japan. Seit einem Jahr lebt sie in Potsdam (NICHT in Berlin!) und hat mitten in der Stadt ihr Atelier, in dem BesucherInnen herzlich willkommen sind.

„Ich wünschte, ich brauchte nicht zu schlafen, um alle Ideen, die ich im Herz und im Kopf habe zu verwirklichen!“ Morgens stehe ich auf, gehe ins Atelier und arbeite. Alles ist ein Prozeß. Es gibt kein „best of“ – I´m looking for something! Kind of struggle with myself. Finish: picture - let it go! “You are behind the picture .”– tension during the work/ Spannung- Anspannung “Painting must talk. If it talks to you- it´s fine!”

Ich wünschte ich hätte endlos Zeit! Arbeit- Lebenszeit – Künstlerin Wenn du´s nie richtig ruhig hast, kann nichts Neues/Frisches entstehen. silent watching: Du arbeitest ständig, schaust ständig. „Look – you have nothing else to do..“ deine Augen sind so wichtig. Kombination von innerem Wissen mit neu Gesehenem Es geht um den einzigartigen Moment, um das individuell Erfahrene und Erfahrbare im Leben. „I look all the time!“ to come to the real things – essence! Hauptthemen: FORM- LICHT- LINIE Alles startet mit einer Form. “I like, what is.” Inspiriert von Natur (nature = pure art= it´s a treasure), Gang der Jahreszeiten Aus der Beobachtung von Dingen im Wandel schöpft Gosha ihre Inspiration, z. B. das täglich neu zu erlebende Werden und Vergehen in der Natur, welches sie direkt vor ihrer Haustür in ihrem Garten beobachten kann. I´m an artist – need no language, ich höre zu Silence in my work “If you are in a deep silence with yourself, the painting flows.” Ihre Kunst ist eine stimmige Kombination eines kreativen Geistes und Blickwinkels, einer sicheren Hand und außergewöhnlichen technischen Fähigkeiten. Quelle von Goshas Kunst: ihre innere Wahrnehmung, ihr Einfühlungsvermögen und ihre Weisheit. “I have my eyes, I have my hands and I have my sense.” Ich arbeite mit Augen und Händen. “It´s like micro and macro!” Glasgefäße – gr. Leinwand Farbe als Stimmungsträger, Gosha mischt alle Farben selbst aneigene Farben, sie möchte wissen, was drin ist, Pigmente Glasgefäße, handgemalte Unikate, Spiel mit dem Licht: Kerze drin – Lichtwechsel- Muster und Farben erfahren bizarre Wandlungen. Manchmal arbeitet sie drei Wochen an einem Glas. Nicht das Ergebnis ist das Wichtigste, sondern der Weg dorthin. Questions are welcome Workshop with Gosha in summer When you not look at art, it´s not alive! Lassen wir die Kunst lebendig werden – hier bei uns. Und dabei: uns begegnen. In Harmonie. Serendipity...

 

Almut Andreae, Art Historian
Altes Rathaus, Potsdam, Germany
Oktober 2008

Reflective Mind

Gosha Nagashima has been a professional artist for over 30 years. Her art is a cohesive combination of a creative spirit and eye with a disciplined hand and exceptional technical skills. The result is art of the finest quality and with true meaning that gives enduring pleasure. Her work is regularly exhibited and is in public & private collections throughout the world. Despite, or perhaps because of her multi-cultural background, Gosha’s work is both timeless and without boundaries, just an unprejudiced view of everything that exists in her reality. Gosha has lived and worked in Potsdam for the last year.

Show full Review (German)

Eröffnungsansprache zur Vernissage der Ausstellung „reflective mind“ mit Malerei und Zeichnungen und Druckgraphik von Gosha Nagashima-Soden im Alten Rathaus Potsdam am 6. Oktober 2008

Es gibt eine Wahrheit, die auch auf Personen, die von Berufs wegen mit Kunst zu tun haben, entwaffnend wirkt: Ein gutes Kunstwerk spricht für sich, die Wahrheit liegt ganz allein bei ihm. Es muss für sich allein bestehen. Ein Bild, das für sich spricht, sich aus eigener Kraft mitteilt, benötigt keine Übersetzungshilfe, keinen ergänzenden Kommentar. Gestatten Sie mir dennoch an dieser Stelle einige einführende Worte, um Sie mit der Künstlerin Gosha Nagashima-Soden näher bekannt zu machen. Erst vor einem Jahr ganz neu in Potsdam angekommen, ist sie hier bislang noch nicht so bekannt.

Vielleicht wird man Gosha am ehesten gerecht, wenn man sie als eine Universalistin beschreibt. Aufgewachsen zunächst in Kaschmir, dann in Polen, war die Tochter eines indisch-polnischen Künstlerpaares von Geburt an mit sehr unterschiedlichen kulturellen Prägungen konfrontiert. Mit Anfang 20 entschied sich Gosha nach Tokyo zu gehen. An der Joshibi University of Art and Design hat sie sich ihren heißen Wunsch erfüllt, Kunst zu studieren. Ebenfalls in Tokyo wurde ihr Sohn Toshi geboren. Im Alter zwischen 20 und 30 nahm Gosha die Einflüsse der japanischen Kultur tief in sich auf. Auf Japan folgte Deutschland. Hier hat die Künstlerin fast 20 Jahre lang in Hamburg gelebt. Der immer wieder neu unternommene Versuch, sich in extrem unterschiedlichen Kulturen zu verwurzeln, ließ Gosha mehr und mehr erkennen, wo sie selbst steht. Wenn sie nun ihrer ersten offiziellen Ausstellung in ihrer neuen Wahlheimat Potsdam den Titel „reflective mind“ verleiht, geschieht das selbstverständlich nicht von ungefähr. Ganz im Gegenteil liegt darin eine ganze Menge Selbst-Offenbarung. Denn was Gosha mit „reflective mind“ umschreibt, ist Spiegel ihrer inneren Haltung und bildlicher Ausdruck für ihren Blick auf die Welt. Indem sie intensiv hinschaut und hinhört, verbindet sich die Künstlerin mit Menschen und Eindrücken einer Landschaft, einer Stadt. Das Erlebnis einer jungen Mutter, die ihr Neugeborenes an sich schmiegt, taucht wie von selbst in der Kunst wieder auf. Hier nimmt es Gestalt an: in einer ganzen Serie von Zeichnungen, von denen sie eine hier sehen. Für weitere Impressionen sorgen die Spaziergänge der Künstlerin durch Potsdam. Vom ersten Moment an ist sie beeindruckt von dem teils morbiden Charme dieser geschichtsträchtigen Stadt. Die jüngsten Bilder Goshas, die noch ein bisschen den Geruch frischer Ölfarbe verströmen, spiegeln ihren Versuch wider, sich malend dem besonderen Flair Potsdams anzunähern. Die charakteristische Farbe der alten Hausfassaden hat sich wie eine zweite Haut über die „Birke mit Mistelzweig“, den „Engel für Potsdam“ und das Gemälde namens „reflective mind“ gelegt. Mit einer malerischen Dokumentation konkreter Situationen und Erlebnisse haben jedoch weder die erwähnten Ölgemälde noch die daneben gezeigten Tuschzeichnungen aus der Serie „walking in potsdam“ etwas zu tun. Selbst wenn die Künstlerin – wie im Falle der kleinen Zeichnungen – im Freien vor dem Motiv arbeitet, ist es nicht ihr Interesse, die Dinge  im Verhältnis 1:1 in die Fläche zu übertragen. In dem Augenblick, wo sie etwas sieht und festhält, hat sie sich schon von dem Vorbild gelöst. Nicht eine Sekunde lang geht es Gosha um einen Abbildungsprozess in realistischer Manier. Ihre Malerei und ihre Zeichnungen werfen die eigenen Empfindungen wie ein Echo zurück. Auch dies ein Aspekt des „reflective mind“ als ein Bewusstseinszustand, indem Erlebnisse, Eindrücke und Emotionen übersetzt werden in Farben, Formen, in Licht und Dunkel und in den Rhythmus der Linien oder einer Kontur.

Goshas Kunst ist geboren aus der Intuition. Um Gestalt anzunehmen – in welcher Form auch immer, sei es als Malerei, Zeichnung, Druckgraphik, Glasmalerei oder Keramik – wird der Zustand innerer Ruhe und Kontemplation zu einer conditio sine qua non, zur unabdingbaren Voraussetzung. Nur dann steigen die inneren Bilder an die Oberfläche hoch und verlangen danach, Gestalt anzunehmen. Diese Vision von dem zu schaffenden Werk gibt Gosha den entscheidenden Impuls für den künstlerischen Akt. Bemerkenswert ist: mit der selben Hingabe entwickelt die Künstlerin eine Tuschzeichnung, arbeitet an einem Ölgemälde oder widmet sich der minutiösen Malerei filigraner Blütenranken auf Glas. Wenn auch unterschiedlich in der Anmutung, sind der lockere, großzügige Pinselstrich und die feine Miniaturmalerei auf Glas in Wahrheit ganz unmittelbar miteinander verwandt. Das eine ist ohne das andere nicht denkbar, oder anders formuliert: beide Ausdrucksformen bedingen sich gegenseitig. Dabei wirkt die eine auf die andere zurück. Ob Gosha nun auf Leinwand oder Glas malt, ob sie zeichnet oder mit Keramik plastisch arbeitet: in der Herangehensweise bleibt sich die Künstlerin treu. Einflüsse der indischen und japanischen Kunst dokumentieren sich im Einsatz entsprechender Malmittel und Techniken. Neben der charakteristischen schwarzen Kalligraphie-Tinte verwendet Gosha mit Vorliebe auch jene orange-rote Shu-Tinte, deren Verwendung in Japan traditionellerweise allein den Lehren zu Korrekturzwecken vorbehalten ist. Statt zur Tube zu greifen, rührt und mischt sich Gosha alle ihre Malmittel nach eigenen Rezepturen an. Die Lust am Experimentieren, am Ausprobieren überträgt sich auch auf die gesamte Arbeitsweise. Immer wieder greift Gosha daher auf verschiedenen Formen der Mischtechnik zurück. In den Zeichnungen gehen Tusche und Wasserfarben neue Verbindungen ein. In viele Gemälden wird geritzt und gezeichnet, bevor die Ölfarbe ganz getrocknet ist. So auch in der Serie der „white flowers“, die die Malerin wie so oft auf unbehandelte Leinwand malt. An vielen Stellen schimmert die grobe Leinenstruktur durch und bildet zur hellen Farbigkeit des Bildes einen reizvollen Kontrast.

Gosha hat neulich halbwegs mit Heiterkeit, halbwegs mit Bedauern gesagt: „I’m a printer without a printing press and a potter without an oven.“ In Ermangelung also einer Druckerpresse und eines Keramikofens beschränkt sich die universell agierende Künstlerin zurzeit auf die Zeichnung und die Malerei. Dennoch, oder vielleicht auch gerade deswegen, kann man in ihrer Kunst beobachten, wie sich beispielsweise in der Malerei Gestaltungselemente der Druckgraphik wieder finden und umgekehrt. Druckgraphische Arbeiten aus dem Werk der Künstlerin sind in dieser Ausstellung am Beispiel von Radierungen, Lithographien und Linolschnitt aus früheren Jahren  zu sehen. Für die Arbeitsweise Goshas charakteristisch ist, dass sie an Gewesenes immer wieder gerne anknüpft. Die Offenheit für neue Ausdrucksformen und die Wiederaufnahme früherer Themen und Techniken gehen Hand in Hand. Auch wenn es gewisse Vorlieben für bestimmte Motive wie für pflanzliche Formen, für die weibliche Figur oder Porträts gibt, entwickelt sich die Kunst Goshas gleichzeitig in die Freiheit der Abstraktion als Loslösung vom Gegenstand. Betrachtet man die künstlerische Arbeit Goshas als einen Prozess anhaltender Suche nach authentischen Antworten auf die Fragen des eigenen Seins, so liegt ein Schlüssel des Verstehens darin zu definieren: was nicht ist. Indem sie konsequent weglässt, was im Hinblick auf die Aussage einer künstlerischen Arbeit unwesentlich, ja überflüssig ist, beschreitet Gosha mehr und mehr den Weg der Abstraktion. Abstraktion verstanden als Reduktion und Verdichtung auf das, was wirklich wesentlich ist. Um zu der Einfachheit und Leichtigkeit zu gelangen, die insbesondere Goshas Arbeiten auf Papier auszeichnen, ist in der Vorstufe ein langer, nicht selten mühevoller Prozess notwendig. Er ist erst dann vollendet, wenn sich ein Kunstwerk maximal an die Ausgangsvision angenähert hat. Dieser Prozess geht einher mit Reifung und braucht für seine Vollendung Zeit, Ausdauer und sehr viel Raum. Um das Gemälde mit dem Titel „Eclipse“ („Finsternis“ – von Sonne oder Mond) fertig zu stellen, war zunächst ein kompletter Umzug zu von Hamburg nach Potsdam zu bewältigen. Denn als Gosha mit ihrem Mann Grahame vor einem Jahr die Remise im Hof der Dortustraße 55 bezog, um sich diese Schritt für Schritt zu dem heutigen stimmungsvollen Galerie-Atelier auszubauen, war es just das unter dem Titel „Eclipse“ vollendete Gemälde, das die Malerin erst wirklich in Potsdam ankommen ließ. Als ihr im größten Umzugschaos das unfertige Bild in die Hände fiel, war ihr mit einem Mal klar, welche Wendung das Bild nehmen musste, um fertig zu sein. Entstanden ist, Farbschicht für Farbschicht, ein sich verschwiegen gebendes Gemälde. Abhängig vom Lichteinfall hüllt es sich, ohne auch nur die geringste Zutat von Schwarz, in bedeutungsvolle Dunkelheit.

Meine sehr verehrten Damen und Herren, ich lade Sie nun ein, in Goshas Bildern mit eigenen Augen auf Entdeckungsreise zu gehen und mit der Künstlerin ins Gespräch zu kommen.

 

Angela Di Bello
Director of Agora Gallery / Editor-in-Chief of ArtisSpectrum Magazine,
New York, USA

The paintings are skillfully executed in style and thematic milieu, achieving poignancy through a unique perspective that resonates throughout the body of work.  The rich earth toned colors provide the emotional sustenance that is communicated in all of the paintings. Resolute in style, technique and perspective, I feel that the paintings have broad appeal and will resonate well in New York and with our international audience.

 

Staatsballett Berlin
Präsente zum Saisonauftakt | Gifts for the dancers

https://staatsballettberlin.wordpress.com/2011/09/26/prasente-zum-saisonauftakt-gifts-for-the-dancers/

Letzten Freitag war Marlene Krug, eine Patin aus dem Freundeskreis des Staatsballetts Berlin, zu Besuch.

Vor dem morgendlichen Training versammelte sich die gesamte Compagnie im Tatjana-Gsovsky-Studio.

Hier bekamen Vladimir Malakhov sowie die ersten Solotänzerinnen und -tänzer, stellvertretend für die gesamte Compagnie, ein Geschenk zum Spielzeitauftakt von ihr überreicht: ein personalisiertes Windlicht.

Die farbenfrohen Windlichter hat die Künstlerin Gosha individuell für alle Tänzerinnen und Tänzer hergestellt.

Gifts for the dancers

Last Friday Marlene Krug, member of the Circle of Friends of the Staatsballett Berlin, visited us. Before class starting at 10.30, the whole company met in the Tatjana-Gsovsky-Studio, where she handed out her presents to Vladimir Malakhov and the principals: a personalized candle light for each of them.

The artist Gosha designed the colorful lights individually for the whole company.